www.WDIO.com

Amsoil Duluth National

Posted at: 12/03/2013 7:32 PM
Updated at: 12/04/2013 11:12 PM
By: Laura Kennedy
lkennedy@wdio.com



They're tough, fearless, and have pink numbers on their sleds.

These are the women of the snocross pro am circuit. Like their male counterparts, they spend the winter chasing an adrenaline rush.

"Well, it's kind of scary, but it's a lot of fun. You have to kind of let go of your fear and just go and do it," said Hailee Petosky.

Snocross is often a family affair. For Hailee and her sister, Courtney, racing together doesn't mean going easy each other.

"When we get close or we get in each other's way, we get a little rough," Hailee said.

"Either she pushes me out, or I push her out," Courtney said. "I try to do what I can to get her away from me."

Nineteen-year-old Courtney and 15-year old Hailee have been battling on the track for eight years. They are encouraged to see more and more women joining them at the starting line.

"You see a totally different side to the sport when you're a female," Courtney said. "It's a good feeling to be able to keep up in the pro women and know that I can be a pro, just like the men can."

"Trying to break into something that's more male dominant kind of makes you feel cool," Hailee said. "No one else knows that women are involved in this kind of thing, and it's cool being one of those women."

Both sisters made the final at the Amsoil Duluth National, but it was Marica Renheim of Sweden who took the checkers.

"I had a great start today, and that's unusual for me," Renheim said. "Then I just did my own race and it went good."

Renheim is proud to inspire other young athletes, and not just the girls.

"It means a lot. It's good for all the women to see that a girl can win this too, and I love that," Renheim said. "There are many boys actually that think it's fun when girls ride."